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dc.contributor.authorMaseda, Ana
dc.contributor.authorCibeira, Nuria
dc.contributor.authorLorenzo-López, Laura
dc.contributor.authorGonzález-Abraldes, Isabel
dc.contributor.authorBuján, Ana
dc.contributor.authorDe Labra Pinedo, Carmen
dc.contributor.authorMillán-Calenti, José Carlos
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-02T10:07:12Z
dc.date.available2018-07-02T10:07:12Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationMaseda A, Cibeira N, Lorenzo-López L, González-Abraldes I, Buján A, Larbra C, et al. Multisensory stimulation and individualized music sessions on older adults with severe dementia: effects on mood, behavior, and biomedical parameters. J Alzheimers Dis. 2018;63(4):1415-1425es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1387-2877
dc.identifier.issn1875-8908
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2183/20833
dc.description.abstract[Abstract] Background:Multisensory stimulation and individualized music have shown to be good in handling the psychological and behavioral symptoms in people with severe dementia. Objective:Explore the effects of two nonpharmacological interventions, multisensory stimulation environment (MSSE) in a Snoezelen room and individualized music sessions, on mood, behavior, and biomedical parameters of institutionalized elderly patients with severe dementia. Methods:Randomized trial of 21 patients aged ≥65 years randomly assigned to two groups (MSSE and individualized music). Interventions administered in two-weekly sessions lasted 30 minutes for a period of 12 weeks. Main outcomes were recorded before, during, and at the end of the intervention. Results:Both groups had immediate positive effects on mood and behavior. Participants were more happy/more content (p < 0.001), talked more spontaneously (p = 0.009), related to people better (p = 0.002), were more attentive to/focused on their environment (p < 0.001), enjoyed themselves (p = 0.003), were less bored/inactive (p = 0.004), and more relaxed/content (p = 0.003). The MSSE group performed a better visual follow-up of the stimuli (p = 0.044), and the music group were more relaxed and happy (p = 0.003). A decrease in heart rate (p = 0.013) and an increase in oxygen saturation (p = 0.011) were observed from before to after interventions in both groups, with no significant differences between them. Conclusions:Both interventions seem to be effective at managing mood and behavioral disturbances in the short term and at improving physiological rates, highlighting the efficacy of nonpharmacological treatments in patients with severe dementia.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipGalicia. Consellería de Cultura, Educación e Ordenación Universitaria; ED431C 2017/49es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipGalicia. Consellería de Cultura, Educación e Ordenación Universitaria; IN607Ces_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherIOS Presses_ES
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.3233/JAD-180109es_ES
dc.rightsThe final publication is avaliable at IOS Press Content Libraryes_ES
dc.subjectDementiaes_ES
dc.subjectElderlyes_ES
dc.subjectIndividualized musices_ES
dc.subjectRandomized triales_ES
dc.subjectSnoezelenes_ES
dc.titleMultisensory stimulation and individualized music sessions on older adults with severe dementia: effects on mood, behavior, and biomedical parameterses_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.rights.accessinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
UDC.journalTitleJournal of Alzheimer's Diseasees_ES
UDC.volume63es_ES
UDC.issue4es_ES
UDC.startPage1415es_ES
UDC.endPage1425es_ES


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