Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMena, Álvaro
dc.contributor.authorMeijide, Héctor
dc.contributor.authorRodríguez-Osorio, Iria
dc.contributor.authorCastro-Iglesias, Ángeles
dc.contributor.authorPoveda, Eva
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-21T08:15:31Z
dc.date.issued2017-02-23
dc.identifier.citationMena A, Meijide H, Rodríguez-Osorio I, Castro A. Poveda E. Liver-related mortality and hospitalizations attributable to chronic hepatitis C virus coinfection in persons living with HIV. HIV Med. 2017;18(9):685-689es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1464-2662
dc.identifier.issn1468-1293
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2183/19515
dc.description.abstract[Abstract] Objectives. The aim of this study was to compare liver-related mortality and liver-related hospitalizations for persons living with HIV (PLWH) with and without hepatitis C virus (HCV) exposure, and to estimate the fraction of liver disease attributable to chronic HCV coinfection. Methods. An ambispective cohort study followed PLWH between 1993 and 2014. PLWH were classified into three groups: those who were HIV-monoinfected, those who cleared HCV spontaneously and those with chronic HCV coinfection. Liver-related mortality was estimated for the three groups and compared with the adjusted standardized mortality ratio. Results. Data for 2379 PLWH were included in the study (1390 monoinfected individuals, 146 spontaneous HCV resolvers and 843 with chronic HCV coinfection). Global mortality was 33.8%, 21.4% of which was liver-related. Patients who died from liver-related causes were mostly on antiretroviral therapy and had an undetectable HIV viral load when they died. The liver-related mortality rate in those with chronic HCV coinfection was 10.01 per 1000 patient-years vs. 3.84 per 1000 patient-years in the HIV-monoinfected group (P < 0.001). The adjusted standardized mortality ratio in the chronically HCV-coinfected group was 4.52 (95% confidence interval 2.98–5.86). The fractions of liver-related mortality and liver-related hospitalizations attributable to chronic HCV coinfection were 0.61 and 0.74, respectively. There were no differences in liver-related events between HIV-monoinfected individuals and those who spontaneously cleared HCV. Conclusions. Chronic HCV infection increases the risk of liver-related mortality and liver-related hospitalizations in PLWH, despite good control of HIV infection. Sixty per cent of liver-related mortality in chronically HCV-coinfected PLWH could be attributable to chronic HCV infection. The effect of mass HCV eradication with new therapies should be evaluated.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipInstituto de Salud Carlos III; CPII14/00014es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipInstituto de Salud Carlos III; PI10/02166es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipInstituto de Salud Carlos III; PI13/02266es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipInstituto de Salud Carlos III; CM13/00328es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherWileyes_ES
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/hiv.12502es_ES
dc.rightsThis is the peer reviewed version of the article which has been published in final form at Wiley Online Library. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Condiitons for self-archivinges_ES
dc.subjectHepatitis C virus coinfectiones_ES
dc.subjectLiver-related hospitalizationes_ES
dc.subjectLiver-related mortalityes_ES
dc.subjectPeople living with HIVes_ES
dc.titleLiver-related mortality and hospitalizations attributable to chronic hepatitis C virus coinfection in persons living with HIVes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.rights.accessinfo:eu-repo/semantics/embargoedAccesses_ES
dc.date.embargoEndDate2018-02-23es_ES
dc.date.embargoLift2018-02-23
UDC.journalTitleHIV Medicinees_ES
UDC.volume18es_ES
UDC.issue9es_ES
UDC.startPage685es_ES
UDC.endPage689es_ES


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record