Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRuiz Ortiz, Martín
dc.contributor.authorMuñiz, Javier
dc.contributor.authorEsteve-Pastor, María Asunción
dc.contributor.authorMarín, Francisco
dc.contributor.authorRoldán, Inmaculada
dc.contributor.authorCequier, Ángel
dc.contributor.authorMartínez-Sellés, Manuel
dc.contributor.authorGonzález Saldivar, Hugo
dc.contributor.authorBertomeu, Vicente
dc.contributor.authorAnguita, Manuel
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-19T10:57:01Z
dc.date.available2020-05-19T10:57:01Z
dc.date.issued2020-03-31
dc.identifier.citationRuiz Ortiz M, Muñiz J, Esteve-Pastor MA, et al. Direct Anticoagulants Versus Vitamin K Antagonists in Patients Aged 80 Years or Older With Atrial Fibrillation in a “Real-world” Nationwide Registry: Insights From the FANTASIIA Study. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol Ther. 2020es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1940-4034
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2183/25597
dc.description.abstract[Abstract] Objective: To describe major events at follow up in octogenarian patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) according to anticoagulant treatment: direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) versus vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). Methods: A total of 578 anticoagulated patients aged ≥80 years with AF were included in a prospective, observational, multicenter study. Basal features, embolic events (stroke and systemic embolism), severe bleedings, and all-cause mortality at follow up were investigated according to the anticoagulant treatment received. Results: Mean age was 84.0 ± 3.4 years, 56% were women. Direct oral anticoagulants were prescribed to 123 (21.3%) patients. Compared with 455 (78.7%) patients treated with VKAs, those treated with DOACs presented a lower frequency of permanent AF (52.9% vs 61.6%, P = .01), cancer history (4.9% vs 10.9%, P = .046), renal failure (21.1% vs 32.2%, P = .02), and left ventricular dysfunction (2.4% vs 8.0%, P = .03); and higher frequency of previous stroke (26.0% vs 16.6%, P = .02) and previous major bleeding (8.1% vs 3.6%, P = .03). There were no significant differences in Charlson, CHA2DS2VASc, nor HAS-BLED scores. At 3-year follow up, rates of embolic events, severe bleedings, and all-cause death (per 100 patients-year) were similar in both groups (DOACs vs VKAs): 0.34 vs 1.35 (P = .15), 3.45 vs 4.41 (P = .48), and 8.2 vs 11.0 (P = .18), respectively, without significant differences after multivariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.25, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.03-1.93, P = .19; HR: 0.88, 95% CI: 0.44-1.76, P = .72 and HR: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.53-1.33, P = .46, respectively). Conclusion: In this “real-world” registry, the differences in major events rates in octogenarians with AF were not statistically significant in those treated with DOACs versus VKAs.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherSAGEes_ES
dc.relation.urihttps://doi-org.accedys.udc.es/10.1177/1074248420916316es_ES
dc.subjectDirect oral anticoagulantses_ES
dc.subjectVitamin K antagonistses_ES
dc.subjectAtrial fibrillationes_ES
dc.subjectOctogenarianses_ES
dc.subjectFANTASIIA registryes_ES
dc.titleDirect Anticoagulants Versus Vitamin K Antagonists in Patients Aged 80 Years or Older With Atrial Fibrillation in a “Real-world” Nationwide Registry: Insights From the FANTASIIA Studyes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.rights.accessinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
UDC.journalTitleJournal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeuticses_ES


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record